THE HERMITAGE AND TSARSKOYE SELO. THE RUSSIAN MUSEUM AND PETERHOF. THESE AND MANY OTHER PETERSBURG ATTRACTIONS HAVE LONG BEEN “MUSTSEES” FOR ALL VISITORS TO THE CITY. HOWEVER, THERE ARE OTHER PLACES THAT VERY FEW TOURISTS KNOW ABOUT.

The Seven Bridges
A place that is in many ways a symbol of this city sliced every which way by rivers and canals. Standing at the center of Pikalov Bridge with St. Nicholas Cathedral to your left, turn slowly around clockwise and you’ll be able from one point to see seven different bridges.
Address: 133A, Naberezhnaya Kanala Griboedova.

The Petersburg Angel
This unobtrusive statue by the sculptor Roman Shustov is the embodiment of St. Petersburg’s intelligentsia. An umbrella, an old overcoat, a tattered scarf, an open book, and two wings protruding behind – the figure is the symbolic representation of a citizen who has had a hard life, but has managed to retain a spirit of tenderness, optimism, and love.
Address: Izmaylovsky Garden, 114, Naberezhnaya Reki Fontanki.

Rasputin’s House
This building, with its unusual architecture, has always attracted those with an interest in the occult. Thanks to the notoriety of Rasputin, this is a soughtafter destination for those who believes in mysticism.
Address: 57, Gorokhovaya Ulitsa.

Russia in Miniature
Ever wanted to see all of Russia in one go? In St. Petersburg, there’s a place where you can visit Moscow, Sochi, Vladivostok, and Murmansk. Moreover, this scale model bubbles with life – the time of year and the time of day are
constantly changing, the highways blaze with light, trains race along rails, and the tiny inhabitants are all busily occupied.
Address: 16, Tsvetochnaya Ulitsa

Museum of Street Art
Situated on the territory of an industrial facility, this museum encompasses a wide variety of street art, including a permanent graffiti collection, by the best Russian and international street artists. The museum also hosts a
wide range of festivals, concerts, and screenings.
Address: 84, Shosse Revolyutsii.

Five Corners
This unique road junction has become a Petersburg attraction, thanks to the unusual form and attractive architecture of the main building located there. The location is also notable as the end of Ulitsa Rubinshteina, which
has a reputation as one of St.Petersburg’s main party streets.
Address: 11, Zagorodny Prospekt.

Eliseev Store
A “gastronomic paradise”, to which a visit in Soviet times was like a sightseeing tour to view the culinary delights on sale. The Eliseev family’s store was opened in 1903, and boasts a stunning Art Nouveau building, where the
sumptuous decorations blend seamlessly into the luxury goodies on display.
Address: 56/8, Nevsky Prospekt.

The street that doesn’t exist
You won’t find John Lennon Street on any map of St. Petersburg, but it does exist in the Pushkinskaya 10 Art Center. If you’re looking for a little taste of Beatlemania, it’s worth a visit to see the murals featuring the members of the group, a yellow submarine, and much more.
Address: 10, Pushkinskaya Ulitsa (entrance from 53, Ligovsky Prospekt)

TEXT: VLADIMIR SERGACHEV

Seven Bridges, as seen from the center of Pikalov Bridge
Seven Bridges, as seen from the center of Pikalov Bridge
Rasputin’s House on Gorokhovaya Ulitsa
Rasputin’s House on Gorokhovaya Ulitsa
The Petersburg Angel by sculptor Roman Shustov
Graffiti Artists’ Gallery and the Museum of Street Art
The Art Nouveau Eliseev Store
Five Corners, the landmark building at the corner of Ulitsa Rubinshteyna
The whole country in full view at Grand Maquette Rossiya
John Lennon Street, not marked on any map

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